Tag Archives: Environmentally Safe Cleaning

What You Purchase, When You Purchase House Cleaning From Green Clean

The obvious answer is a clean house, but that is not the whole story. How much time do you spend cleaning your home each week? You go to work; you cook meals, and take care of household necessities. When do you have time to clean your home? On the weekend: there is church, taking care of the yard, cleaning your car, visiting family and friends. What do you miss when taking time to clean house? When you clean, what cleaning gets neglected because you don’t really want to clean? Purchasing a cleaning service from professional house cleaners allows you freedom. You have freedom to go out with friends and family and do what you want. Go play in the mountains and ski, play in the lakes, rivers and forests of Idaho. Maybe just sit down and play cards or a board game with your children rather than scrubbing the toilet. A clean home gives you time and peace of mind. What a valuable purchase it is.

By purchasing a green home cleaner, you are assured that the cleaning process used is safe for your health, your children and pet’s health and prolongs the life of your valuable furnishings and floors. Green Clean assures that no toxic chemicals are brought into your home. All that is left behind is a clean home and a fresh scent.

Contact Green Clean Idaho to schedule your appointment and start getting more free time in your life!

Advertisements

Why Green Your Cleaning Products

The following article was found on the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) web site. The article effectively explores why it is important to be concerned with the cleaners that are used in cleaning office space. Please consider this information as it applies to your work space.

 

Why Green Your Cleaning Products?

Environmental and Health Concerns

NOTE: The following discussion primarily addresses hazards associated with cleaning product ingredients. The actual risks from these chemicals at typical exposure levels are often uncertain, and in many cases are probably low. Regardless of the expected risk levels, however, reducing the intrinsic hazard of a product is a desirable pollution prevention objective as part of decisions that also take into account other important product attributes.

  • Cleaning products are released to the environment during normal use through evaporation of volatile components and rinsing down the drain of residual product from cleaned surfaces, sponges, etc.      Janitorial staff and others who perform cleaning can be exposed to concentrated cleaning products. However, proper training and use of a Chemical Management System (a set of formal procedures to ensure proper storage, handling, and use) can greatly minimize or prevent exposure to concentrated cleaning product during handling and use.
  • Certain ingredients in cleaning products can present hazard concerns to exposed populations (e.g., skin and eye irritation in      workers) or toxicity to aquatic species in waters receiving inadequately treated wastes (note that standard sewage treatment effectively reduces or removes most cleaning product constituents). For example, alkylphenol ethoxylates, a common surfactant ingredient in cleaners, have been shown in laboratory studies to function as an “endocrine disrupter,” causing adverse reproductive effects of the types seen in wildlife exposed to polluted waters.
  • Ingredients containing phosphorus or nitrogen can contribute to nutrient-loading in water bodies, leading to adverse effects on water quality. These contributions, however, are typically small      compared to other point and non-point sources.
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOC) in cleaning products can affect indoor air quality and also contribute to smog formation in      outdoor air.

(Sources: Choose Green Report on General Purpose Cleaners, Green Seal, March 1998; Green Seal Standard and Environmental Evaluation for General-Purpose, Bathroom, and Glass Cleaners Used for Industrial and Institutional Purposes, October 2000; Hormonally Active Agents in the Environment, National Research Council, National Academy Press, 1999)

Magnitude of Potential Exposure

  • The cleaning industry employs about 2.8 million potentially exposed janitors. In addition to these professional janitorial staff, who can be assumed to use cleaning products daily, many other building occupants perform light cleaning on a routine or occasional basis, e.g. dusting, wiping off desks and counters, etc. All building      occupants are potentially exposed to the volatile components of cleaning products.
  • Data from Washington State show that about 6 percent of janitors experience a job-related injury from chemical exposure to      cleaning products every year.

(Sources: Green Seal Standard and Environmental Evaluation for General-Purpose, Bathroom, and Glass Cleaners Used for Industrial and Institutional Purposes, October 2000; Greening the Janitorial Business- How to Select and Use Safe Janitorial Chemicals, Workshop for NISH, US Dept. of Interior, November 2001)

Benefits of Buying Green

  • Choosing less hazardous products that have positive      environmental attributes (e.g., biodegradability, low toxicity, low      volatile organic compound (VOC) content, reduced packaging, low life cycle energy use) and taking steps to reduce exposure can minimize harmful impacts to custodial workers and building occupants, improve indoor air quality, and reduce water and ambient air pollution while also ensuring the effectiveness of cleaning in removing biological and other contaminants from the building’s interior.
  • Buying cleaners in concentrates with appropriate handling safeguards, and reusable, reduced, or recyclable packaging,      reduces packaging waste and transportation energy.
  • Buying less hazardous cleaners may reduce costs when it comes time to properly dispose of any leftover cleaners.

Why Green?

Why Green?

Green house cleaning promotes health, safety and social consciousness. Green products and techniques focus on improving indoor air quality, recycling, and minimizing the use of raw materials and toxic products that require disposal. Green cleaning can help decrease air pollution, water pollution, ozone depletion and global climate change.

Residential green cleaning reduces potential allergens and toxic cleaning products that have been linked to childhood wheezing. Wheezing is a primary symptom of asthma in children. Asthma affects 6.5 million children in the U.S., a rate of 97.2 per 1000 (American Lung Association, 2007). Asthma triggers include tobacco smoke, animal dander, paint fumes and other odors, duct mites, cockroaches, molds, and pollens. Green cleaning can greatly reduce many of these triggers in the home.

Green cleaning does not use chemical irritants such as bleach, carpet cleaners, aerosols, air fresheners, or ammonia. These chemicals irritate the bronchial passageways of children, pets and adults with respiratory conditions. Green cleaning products include common kitchen ingredients – water, white vinegar, baking soda and castile soap – and are safe to use on household surfaces. These ingredients are safe to use in the home and would not harm an individual if ingested – though the castile soap would not taste good!

Commercial green cleaning increases workplace safety, health, productivity, and return on investment (ROI) of facilities. The cleaning solutions used by Green Cleanare Green Seal certified and are equally effective as cleaning agents as tradition cleaning solutions. Green cleaning practices do not expose workers to harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fluorocarbons that decrease indoor air quality (IAQ). Green cleaning can help reduce the costs to building management including costs associated with sick leave, health care, and productivity loss. Green Cleanuses energy-efficient equipment and focuses on preventative maintenance to reduce expenses.

A further advantage to commercial green cleaning is the enhancement of the organization’s reputation and brand equity because being socially conscious has become a desirable business trait. Green cleaning with Green Clean can earn LEED credits. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is a series of building ratings developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to provide a standard for what constitutes a “green building” or “high performance” building. There is an effort underway to develop LEED for homes.

There are many reasons for cleaning green today. Idaho and the Boise area are known for their natural beauty and deserve to be protected for the enjoyment of generations to come.